Photos of the Completed SMS Hindenburg

(Newest photos at the bottom)

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Early Spring, 1998 -- The SMS Hindenburg prior to having the balsa sheeting and paint applied.
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Early Spring, 1998 -- Here you can look through the hull to see the placement of (right to left): the CO2 tank, radiobox, batteries, motors/pump, and rudder watertight box.
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Early Spring, 1998 -- SMS Hindenburg after painting in preparation for the 1998 Northeast Spring Regionals.
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Early Spring, 1998 -- A stern shot of the Hindenburg.
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July, 1998 -- SMS Hindenburg at the Sunday speed trials of the 1998 Nationals. The masts are stepped but not yet rigged.
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July, 1998 -- One last lookover by our planet AAXXIISS TechRep before the start of the 1998 Nationals.
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July, 1998 -- SMS Hindenburg ready for battle at the 1998 Nationals. The masts are rigged and signal flags are flying the 1998 Axis slogan - "Wail Away 98."
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Over the winter of 1998-1999, I decided to change the depression angle on my propeller shafts and change the rudders to scale shape and size. This is the result as seen in the Spring of 1999.
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Spring, 1999 -- I also changed to a grey paint scheme that was more like the type she would have worn during World War I.
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Spring, 1999 -- This is another (and better) view. The colors are two different shades of grey, but it wasn't until summer that I mixed paint to match a color chart for German warships I received from a friend in Germany.
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Spring, 1999 -- Here is a close-up of superstructure.
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Spring, 1999 -- And a closer photo of the bridge and foreward turrets.
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July, 1999 -- As I mentioned, by the 1999 Nationals I had received a color chart for German ships. At Home Depot I mixed a quart each of the Silver Grey (superstructure), Squirrel Grey (hull above the waterline), and Red-Brown (hull below the waterline) and the result is seen here and below.
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July, 1999 -- The other side.
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July, 2000 -- Just prior to the 2000 IR/CWCC Nationals I rebuilt the forward superstructure of the Hindenburg to better reflect how the deckhouse and platforms behind the bridge appeared. This photos shows how the superstructure looked before the refit began, with the foremast partially removed.
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July, 2000 -- Close-up of the foremast.
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July, 2000 -- The old pine block deckhouse is removed. In the background is the material I use for through material (to keep BBs from going in one side of the hull and out "through" the other side) and to simulate intake vents.
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July, 2000 -- Here the new deckhouse assembly with lower platform is installed. It is made of 1/16" aircraft plywood coated inside and out with epoxy. Notice the fiberglass funnel has had all the paint sanded off the areas the epoxy is to be used. This is essential for a good bond.
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July, 2000 -- Another view of the above photo. The upper deck of the deckhouse is just to the left awaiting final cutting to fit around the funnel.
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July, 2000 -- I also took the opportunity to fix several ribs that had either been shot through and/or the gel-coat had shattered. Basic technique was to coat the area with epoxy (and fiberglass cloth if necessary), then place a piece of electrical tape over the area to be repaired to help keep the orginal shape of the rib, then put that side of the ship tape down to allow the epoxy to pool into all the nooks and crannies and solidify. Remove the tape and trim with a Dremel.
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July, 2000 -- Here the second and third ribs have been repaired, the third practically replaced.
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July, 2000 -- Here she sits after the first sortie of the first battle at the 2000 IR/CWCC Nationals.
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July, 2000 -- Hindenburg on the bench after that first battle. Notice the completed superstructure work and the cranes.
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March, 2001 -- One of the few interior photos that have come out even half decently.
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March, 2001 -- If it's Spring, it must be time to refit the Hindenburg. I received a bunch of new photos and original plans from contacts I developed working on my German Navy in World War I website, so of course I felt compelled to start working on making my model more accurate. This is one of the photos I took before beginning work.
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This page Copyright 1998 - 2001, Thomas L. Tanner, Jr. unless otherwise noted.